The Apostle Paul wrote fourteen letters that have been received by the church as Holy Scripture. Four of these letters were correspondence to individuals; two to Timothy, one to Titus, and one to Philemon. The other ten were written to churches or, in the case of the letters to the Galatians and the Hebrews, a larger nonspecific group - Christians. This summer we will study each of the letters in turn to see what issues Christians were facing in Paul's day that could be applicable to modern faith.



June 3rd
Title:"Letter to the Colossians"
Scripture: Psalm 15 & Colossians 1:15-28
Thought for Preparation: Of the letters Paul wrote to worshipping communities, Colossians is the shortest (the two separate letters to the church in Thessalonica are each shorter but combined they are longer). Here we'll explore Paul's theological assertion that declares Christ's supremacy over the entire created universe and how he exhorts Christians to lead godly lives.


June 10th Graduate Recognition Sunday
Title:"Letter to the Philippians"
Scripture: Psalm 78:1-4, 12-16 & Philippians 2:1-13
Thought for Preparation: This letter is perhaps the fullest expression of Paul's Christology. Based on his knowledge of Jesus Paul prays for love and for the Philippians to enjoy the peace of God which passes all understanding. Now they are Citizens of Heaven but servants of Christ and are called to live humbly.


June 17th Father's Day
Title:"First and Second Letters to the Thessalonians"
Scripture: Psalm 126 & 1 Thessalonians 5:16-24
Thought for Preparation: First Thessalonians, which is quite short, is believed by scholars to have been the first letter written by Paul. It concerns inter-Christian relationships but not inter-faith ones. It also isn't as theologically complex as subsequent letters. The second letter is an exhortation to remain strong in the faith - especially in the face of false teachers.

Listen Sermon 12-17


June 24th
Title:"Letter to the Ephesians"
Scripture: Psalm 85:8-13 & Ephesians 1:3-14
Thought for Preparation: According to tradition, the Apostle Paul wrote the letter while he was in prison in Rome. Paul spent over three years in Ephesus so this congregation was near and dear to his heart. The emphasis of this epistle is since Jesus sacrificed himself for us then the members of the worshipping community should, likewise, be sacrificial towards one another.

July 1st
Sermon Title:“First Letter to the Corinthians”
Scripture: Psalm 71:1-6 & 1 Corinthians 13:1-13
Thought for Preparation: The church in Corinth was racked with divisions and strife; many stemming from the community's members who had been Gentiles prior to conversion. Paul wrote to set things straight and as such the First Letter to the Corinthians has been dubbed a “masterpiece of pastoral theology.”

July 8th
Sermon Title:“Second Letter to the Corinthians”
Scripture: Psalm 32 & 2 Corinthians 5:16-21
Thought for Preparation: Evidently, a single letter wasn't enough to set the congregation in Corinth straight. Paul also paid the church a visit. The Second Letter to the Corinthians contains Paul's defense against those who doubted his authority. From this friction comes an injunction to forgive one another by trusting in the power of the Holy Spirit.

July 15th
Sermon Title:“Letter to the Galatians”
Scripture: Psalm 16 & Galatians 5:1, 13-25
Thought for Preparation: Not written to a specific congregation but to a cluster of churches, in Paul's letter to the Galatians he reminds them of his biographical heritage while instructing them that the old Mosaic Laws aren't binding, thus freeing them to worship God more authentically. Coming from a former Jew to former Gentiles he reminds the people that we are all one in Jesus.

June 17th Father's Day
Sermon Title:“First and Second Letters to the Thessalonians”
Scripture: Psalm 126 & 1 Thessalonians 5:16-24
Thought for Preparation: First Thessalonians, which is quite short, is believed by scholars to have been the first letter written by Paul. It concerns inter-Christian relationships but not inter-faith ones. It also isn't as theologically complex as subsequent letters. The second letter is an exhortation to remain strong in the faith - especially in the face of false teachers.

July 22nd
Sermon Title:“Letter to the Hebrews”
Scripture: Psalm 19 & Hebrews 10:11-14,19-25
Thought for Preparation: Compared to the other epistles which were written with a specific congregation or individual in mind this letter is written as a general exhortation to all persons whose roots are within Hebrew faith (or those who are still in it and contemplating a profession of faith) and therefore stands as something of the “odd man out.” It does articulate how Christianity stands in the line of inheritance from the prophetic promises made to the Chosen People.

July 29th
Sermon Title:“Letter to the Romans”
Scripture: Psalm 95 & Romans 5:1-11
Thought for Preparation: The letter Paul wrote to the church in Rome is considered something of a magnum opus so rich and laden it is with theological insight. It is here that Paul articulates his understanding of the fallenness of human kind and how, through justification through faith, God works salvific grace through the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ.

August 5th
Sermon Title:“Letters to Friends”
Scripture: Psalm 97 & Titus 3:4-7
Thought for Preparation: The four personal epistles of Paul that were preserved by the church as scripture serve as powerful reminders that even though he is revered as an authority of orthodox theology - he “speaks for the church” - he was still a man who walked alongside other disciples and offered words of prayer and encouragement.